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Teabagging is only the beginning. #teaparty

If you aren’t currently aware of the recent trend of teabagging, here’s a good post that I read that links to two videos that explain the political phenomenon. Now, instead of only putting their feet in their mouths, conservative leaders are putting their nuts in the mouths of others, all part of a misguided plan to protest the lack of civil rights that they experienced under the previous president and the lowest taxes this country has seen for quite some time.

I’m not here to get political, though. I’m here to help. Since any publicity is good publicity, this is the best press that far-right conservatives have gotten since Sarah Palin was released on the unsuspecting public like an inconsistent hungry unvetted cougar.

In order to maintain this momentum, it’s imperative that Republican party leaders jump on the chance to create more campaigns that will generate interest (and lots of chuckling) among the youth of America. With that in mind, here are just five of my many ideas for future protests:

1. The Hot Karl

The figurehead of this movement, Karl Rove, will express his outrage over the fact that global warming has affected our environment so badly. He will lead protests of angry Republicans who will demand more environmental safeguards, electric cars, and less reliance on fossil fuels.

2. Snowballing

Fed up with the ever-growing national debt that was obviously started by the incumbent President when he took office three months ago, right-wing activists will gather to sing a protest song “We Will Snowball You”. Large snowballs made from styrofoam will be created and passed back and forth among the protesters.

3. The Dirty Sanchez

The illegal immigration issue that has plagued our country for years has finally come to the attention of xenophobic Republicans, who make their message by sending little dirty dolls that resemble someone from Mexico to their local congressperson. The protest is punctuated by hundreds of keynote speakers who are all white collar criminals who were granted amnesty complaining about immigrants gaining amnesty for violating our laws.

4. Beef Curtains

Recall after recall has infuriated the right-wing extremists, and they have decided that since they didn’t care during the last eight years, maybe now’s the time to complain about an issue that’s already being corrected. The powerful beef lobby leads a massive protest, asking for more regulation and more oversight to make sure that companies stop making Americans sick by cutting corners and lying and cheating and bribing.

5. Cum Dumpster

Infuriated over the rising unemployment rate that must have been caused by our sitting President, ultra right-wing college and high school graduates who graduated magna cum laude or summa cum laude protest by throwing their diplomas in dumpsters across the country. Which their McDonald’s manager make them pick up or they’d be fired.

So who’s with me?

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55 Replies to “Teabagging is only the beginning. #teaparty”

  1. whall

    As I tweeted to a few today, I’d never heard that term in that connotation. Call me ignorant I guess; I can take it.

    I for one am enjoying the peaceful expression of government dissatisfaction and I’m still a little taken aback at the media’s biased coverage of the events.

    15 people show up to Cindy Sheehan’s protest and the media lauds it as “protestors flock to show support for grieving mother”. Contrast that with THOUSANDS that organize and rally for the teaparty and there’s only this mockery and disdain. The only real news reporting is on, you guessed it, evil Fox news. Oh wait, CNN covered the white house teabag thing.

    Figures.

    Oh, and when there’s a black, or lesbian, or woman’s rights, pro-choice, ADD, union, hispanic, disabled, anti-war, immigrant amnesty or other liberal/progressive movement, protest or gathering, how convenient is it that the newspapers do their coverage the day before complete with details on where the event is. But for the teaparty? Most of the news I saw was late in the afternoon the day of the party, or the day after.

    Figures.

    Half the people in America pay no income tax at all, and the remaining burdon is carried by the other half. More and more people are figuring out that they can just vote themselves benefits. They can make the producers carry them on their backs; all they have to do is pay for it with a vote for the group that will give them the most. The politicians, unrestricted by common sense term limits, ensure future votes by doing whatever they can to stay in office, buy their next term, and hey, might as well try to usher in 12-20 million new democratic votes by pushing amnesty for illegals. Why would the newspapers, who will soon require bailouts like the insurance companies and car companies, cover the events that threaten their existence?

    Figures.

    Our representatives (can we really call them that?) passed the largest deficit spending bill in the history of any time ever and most of them didn’t even read it. Despite overwhelming bipartisan opposition to bailouts, they still pass TARP and more and more and more earmarks and pork for their friends and contributors. They are exempt from the laws they pass and are granted a guaranteed pension for life even with only serving one term, not having to live under the tax or 401K laws you and I do.

    Figures.

    You write a post about republicans that actually shows some literary genius and poking fun at the current political mudslinging and I get all serious about it.

    Figures.

    • Miss Britt

      @whall, “The politicians, unrestricted by common sense term limits, ensure future votes by doing whatever they can to stay in office, buy their next term”

      You know that’s bipartisan and doesn’t apply to the presidency, right?

      And also – I agree with that half of that sentence in all that stuff you said. ๐Ÿ™‚

      • whall

        @Miss Britt, yes, I know it’s bipartisan. I say vote them all out (Congress). I’m ok w/Obama as President if we’d have a re-elected Congress. Obama brings a ton of positive things to the Presidency that I wouldn’t want to throw away.

        • Miss Britt

          @whall, Now THAT’s a protest I’d attend. ๐Ÿ˜‰

          You know what would be awesome though? If as citizens we could stop focusing on the politicians, and talk about our overall goals for government and what we think the role of government should be.

          It seems like if we could come to some kind of agreement on THAT – we might actually make some progress.

  2. Amy

    A couple of things to point out with your observations. First of all, your new president signed the biggest waste of money ever seen and called it a stimulus bill. After promising that all pork would have to go to save the country money- this “stimulus” gives us, the little guy, less money and has more than 80,000 pork provisions. Our grandchildren, who aren’t born yet, will be paying for the bill. If the great “leaders” of this country will allow you to take them home from the hospital. Have you seen the new law they’re passing where you have to pass a test to be allowed to take your new baby home from the hospital. Guess the government is going to step in there now too. On top of firing heads of corporations and controlling where my money goes. All the new laws are designed to run the small business owner into the ground. Unless, of course, you live in Kansas and the Obama’s like your pizza and then they’ll spend thousands of taxpayers dollars to fly you to Washington to make their dinner.

    Let’s have some fair reporting by the networks and stop trying to cover up that 1. Obama has lied with every promise he made and 2. He’s no better and no more for the “people” than any other of those money grubbers we’ve had in office. It was a matter of tell people what they want to hear to get votes and loads of propoganda by the people who didn’t bother to report the truth. This country used to be democratic- I’m just glad he’ll be gone in a few years and hopefully he won’t turn us too much into a socialist country before he gets voted out.
    The teaparties were to protest the amount of taxes that he’s putting on our children and grandchildren without the voters of this country having a say. The fact that he’s walking all over our 2nd amendment rights. And Homeland security has branded everyone who went to these teaparties or who voices displeasure over his stomping on 1st and 2nd amendment rights a “right wing radical” who is a “danger.” Me – I’m just a mom trying to get by.

    Just another view point from someone who has been following a lot of little bills getting no media coverage – like the one saying the government will decide if you can take your baby home or not. If you pass their test….

  3. Hilly

    Gee, I didn’t realize this was a political post but I guess with all the serious comments up there, I was wrong. Here I was thinking you were trying to be funny and creative. Oh gee, silly me.

    That being said, I’ve never heard of Snowballing or Beef Curtains (ew). Can you believe? Maybe I should go out to a restaurant and Wiki that shit, huh?

    ๐Ÿ˜‰

  4. Avitable

    Amanda, and just imagine the awesome news coverage of it all.

    Kiefer and Emo, very nice.

    Whall, I agree with you about term limits and pork barreling. The problem with the protest is that by using the term tea party, they’re invoking imagery of the Boston Tea Party and even explicitly referring to it. The Boston Tea Party was, of course, a protest about taxes being levied without representation. That comparison makes no sense – the taxes we have are a result of our representation and they’re lower than taxes under the last three Republican Presidents. So it makes the entire movement feel disingenuous. Can you understand that perspective?

    I agree that the tax code should be simpler. I agree that our representative government should be subject to the same limits and laws that we are. But I also remember when the popular vote elected Al Gore but the electoral vote elected W, being told by everyone that the electoral vote is our representative vote. So this just seems ironic.

    And how could you never have heard of teabagging? It’s one of the more common of the terms I used!

    Amy, “my” president? So you’re not an American? Okay, then your opinion doesn’t count.

    BE Earl, that has promise, too!

    Sybil, I guess you’ll have to come back in the morning and leave a meaningful one, then!

    Ginger, thanks!

    BPR, I’m somewhat in agreement with him too (look at my reply).

    Chris, I’ve never seen someone so excited about that before!

    Geeky, that’s what I’m here for!

    Becky, I know – I should be like a saint or something.

    Hilly, you’ve never heard of snowballing? Did you ever watch Clerks?

    • whall

      @Avitable, I don’t understand why the Boston Tea Party reference is lost. It’s completely relevant. It marked a key event before the American Revolution. All of a sudden, yet another new tax was levied (on tea), *and* there was the whole increasing of the taxation without representation trend, the Tea tax being just the latest in a series. They only had two options: pay the tax or return the tea. They chose to destroy the tea instead.

      I know you don’t need a history lesson, so this isn’t intended to be. The link is that Obama and the democratically-led Congress is acting just as if they were NOT real representatives: they don’t read the bills they approve; they pass bills nobody agrees with; they deficit spend their way to push their agenda on things that aren’t essential to the country’s survival; they pay their friends and supporters instead representing the people. And they’re doing it by taxing a select group of earners. I call that… you guessed it! Taxation without Representation!

      And here’s the real rub: as far as I know, the people doing the Tea Parties are just calling them, well, “Tea Parties.” The only people I’ve heard calling it “teabagging” are people like you and the people who want to make fun (read: are afraid of) of it.

      That video clip was one of the most biased and tilted pieces of crap journalism I’ve ever had the displeasure to watch. Please tell me this was an op-ed piece or talk show host and NOT expected to be journalism or reporting. They even had to inject their editorial “teabagging” reference into the quote! (aka [teabaggers]). MSNBC was the one putting teabagging into the overlay, teabagging into the voiceover and teabagging into the injected quote references. All the video clips of protesters referenced “tea party,” not “teabagging.” I had just assumed the use of the term “teabag” was the Diss Du Jour for the leftist bloggers and the biased media to reluctantly cover something that threatened them, because in general “teabag” sounds worse than “tea party” even BEFORE you throw in the negative connotation.

      As to how I’ve not heard of teabagging… I have no defense. Just never have. Even if I’d heard the term, I never caught the reference.

      • RW

        @whall, It’s pretty disingenuous to characterize President Obama and the Democrat-led (if it were “democratically led”, to oppose it wouldn’t be American Conservative, it would simply be anti-democracy) Congress as you do here. For a second I thought you were talking about the last 8 years. But I always hesitate to say anything because in your universe I can’t examine the policies of President Bush without being labeled a “hater.”

        The notion that “they don’t read the bills they approve” is an absurd characterization and not really an argument. The idea that “They pass bills nobody agrees with” is something you can’t actually empirically know and wouldn’t even be possible in the first place. The concept that “they deficit spend their way to push their agenda on things that aren’t essential to the country’s survival” isn’t unique to this Congress or the current party in power and is as much a matter of opinion from one side as it was when we had to pay for the Reagan deficits. “Pay(ing) their friends and supporters”, of course, never happens with the other side of the aisle.

        And anticipating your next disingenuous argument (that you were talking about everybody and who said anything about just Democrats, or something) my only question would be where was this outrage specified when a Republican was in the White House just a little while ago?

  5. RW

    I want “Amy” to be President so we can stop being a socialist country. Then we won’t be burdened with social security and medicare and medicaid and unemployment insurance and corporate subsidies and FDIC deposit insurance and all these other socialist programs that tear at the fabric of our character. Let the invisible hand of the Darwinian free markets that love us take care of the weakest amongst us. Who needs roads and schools and a national defense when we can teach our kids that slavery didn’t play any part in the coming of the Civil War and do that at home under our gun racks and beside the Bible that everybody knows only talks about how bad gay people are and doesn’t say one word about forgiving your enemies like these Godless socialists try to lie to us about.

    • whall

      @RW, whoa, talk about a tangent. She said “hopefully he won’t turn us too much into a socialist country before he gets voted out” and gave a few relevant examples (laws on taking your baby home and 2nd amendment issues). You, on the other hand, make it out to say she said we WERE socialist and go waaaaay out in some field somewhere with some extreme examples. Oh yeah, and you brought in bibles and gays and religion.

      Wheee! it was a fun ride! Do it again! LET IT BEGIN! LET IT BEGIIIIIIIIIN /rhino

      • RW

        @whall, please. It seems pretty obvious to me that she was making the point that socialism is counter-intuitive to her American ideal. I was merely pointing out that we are already using socialist programs that are such a part of our culture we don’t realize it. Also I believe that my characterization was funny. And though I certainly could be wrong, I don’t think it was all that far off the mark.

        • whall

          @RW, Did I win some lottery I don’t know about? Am I on Punk’d? Are you tired or something? Your comment is so tame! You didn’t tear me a new one! Are you ok? ๐Ÿ™‚

          Now, on to your comment… you say “socialism is counter-intuitive to her American ideal” in much the same crazy way I might expect to hear in an insane asylum when the patient says “murder is counter-productive to your will to live.” Socialism *is* counter-intuitive to the American Ideal. Social Programs (helping the unfortunate or needy) does NOT equal Socialism (State ownership of everything; no individual possessions). The concern I have is that now, more than ever, we run the risk of actually treading into Socialist waters. Gov’t confiscating 401Ks and the like. Gov’t owning (not regulating, but OWNING) banks, insurance companies, car companies, and health companies. That same gov’t is tagging me as a dangerous right-wing liberal with Homeland Security because I attended a peaceful rally. That stuff scares the bejeezus out of me and incites me to action. The 1st round of action is peaceful protest. 2nd round is voting them out. 3rd round ? One of the rounds might be revolt.

          I personally agree with some social programs such as a national transportation / road system, basic education, military, some protection/regulation, stuff like the FAA, etc. Things beyond the basics, however, I feel should be optional and available but not guaranteed to all.

          And you were pretty funny. Sarcasm followed by details = always a big hit when making a point.

          • whall

            @Ginger, I was pretty sure Socialism was the “state owns everything”, Communism is the “collective” or “community” owns everything. I perhaps was combining the two out of convenience but I didn’t mean to misrepresent.

            Google tells me: Definitions of socialism on the Web:

            * a political theory advocating state ownership of industry
            * an economic system based on state ownership of capital
            wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

          • RW

            @whall, well yes my personal opinion of you hasn’t changed one bit, but when I’m visiting other people’s blogs I usually try to edit myself. Feel free to stop by my place any time to receive the enlightenment, and brand new orifice, you so richly deserve. When I’m not just outright ignoring you, that is.

            That said, I think you miss the definition of socialism just a tad. When we give subsidies to farmers, pay them not to grow or to grow certain crops; when we bail-out banks; when we establish a fund to help ease the retirement of people who worked their whole lives; when we aid elderly people in the purchase of medicine; when we supply people recently laid off with some income to help them get back into the market – those are socialist programs. Socialism is a pretty broad set of principles. Anytime resources are pooled for a common purpose you have taken the first steps of creating a centralized “societal benefit” derived from the group. Social security is socialism. The problem is the connotation we’ve put on the word here in America. It’s a boogy-man to many – but largely a straw man in reality.

          • whall

            @RW, I appreciate the tact you granted me. I hear it’s for pussies.

            (ohhhhh, snap!)

            I don’t think I missed Socialism. Socialism is state ownership, and redistribution in equal amounts to everyone. The things you mentioned aren’t socialist; they’re just social, and while they may be first steps towards Socialism, that doesn’t mean they’re inherently bad. Not all slippery slopes are dangerous; they become dangerous when they’re invisible.

            I’m for aid, I’m for helping, I’m for minimal common good to ensure breathing and basic survival. Beyond that, it’s every capitalist for himself.

          • RW

            @whall, ok we’re into semantics, but the “kind” of socialism we always decried in the Old Right (the real one) was any vestige of social interventionism and I think you know that.

            It doesn’t do any good to split pedantic hairs at this point. I think it’s fairly obvious what the complaint is amongst the demonstrators that are at the base of this discussion, and that it remains a strawman.

          • Ginger

            @whall, my understanding has always been that in socialism, the economy is run through collective social control, not “owned” by the government. Communism, however, runs both the economy and the society because all property is, yes, “owned collectively” BUT control of who gets what property centralized in order to achieve a classless society…so in reality, the State owns everything because they control who gets what.

            Anyway…as @RW said, we’re down to semantics. It just caught my eye when you said “State ownership of everything; no individual possessions” because when I visited Eastern Europe during the Communist regime of the USSR, that is definitely what it was…not Socialism, which is how I see our taxes at work, Social Security, etc.

            I do get what you are saying, though.

  6. Faiqa

    I’ve seen coverage of these protests, and I recognize and appreciate the sentiment behind them.

    I also recognize the ironies you’ve pointed out.

    Truth be told, I had something clever to add and, then, I saw the phrase “your president” in someone’s comment.

    As liberal as I am, I never referred to W. as *someone else’s president*.

    Who is your president?

    This choice of words is reflective of the paradigm with which most partisans approach politics (notice I did NOT say conservatives). It ensures that all of the facilities of intellect will now be used to debunk the opposing party, instead of being used to better the situation of the citizens of this nations.

    Unless the commenter was from Canada, in which case, “HEY! Mind your own business.”

  7. Turnbaby

    God I love it when you go all Urban —funny funny funny.

    And thank you for leaving Amy’s url–I always find it amusing when someone just ‘has’ to have their say but it too chicken to back it up by letting folks know who they are.

  8. NYCWD

    I, as a gamer, take great offense at you using the term “Teabagging” in association with peaceful political activity. If this was a real teabagging party, you’d all be dead with my nuts in your mouth while I fragged your neighbors.

    Now as a Republican, well its okay. Let’s see how much you’re hooting and hollering after the mid-term elections.

  9. Kimi

    Loved your creativity this morning. I don’t have anything intelligent to say politically, but I think most of our problems could be solved if everyone used common sense. Unfortunately, most people do not have common sense. Only assholes and opinions.

  10. Finn

    Well… I’ve learned some new things today.

    I did see “Clerks” but missed the snowballing thing. Or I blocked it. Or thought it was just a myth (because what straight guy allows cum in their mouth?).

  11. Dave2

    All these silly protests going on when real issues are being ignored. Like the heinous over-fishing that is destroying our seas. In protest I will be taking the old skin boat to Tuna Town.

    I think the image of dozens of shirtless people on an aging schooner floating into Misaki, Japan will make quite a statement.

  12. Lexi

    I’d love to make some insightful comment about the deep meaning behind these protests, but I’m still laughing at the video…

    “…for the right wing it will be “tea bagging day” and they are going nuts for it”

    and…

    “…the teabaggers are full-throated about their goals…”

  13. Avitable

    RW, Whall, Ginger, can’t we all agree that I should be elected ruler of the universe and then everything would be fine?

    Faiqa, yeah, that stuck out to me, too.

    SciFi Dad, I’ve never heard of handballing before!

    Karen, c’mon, spill it!

    Turnbaby, urban? You mean like the dictionary? I’m proud to say that I know all of these without the help of the urban dictionary!

    Bubblewench, well, I was taking a political side with it.

    LeSombre, just imagine hot Karl giving a Hot Karl to your mom!

    Robin, sweet.

    NYCWD, the gaming community stole that from frat boys.

    LMSS, oh, I should have taken photographs of everything just for proof.

    Kimi, common sense does seem to be in scarce supply.

    Finn, it’s not always voluntary on the guy’s part.

    Grant, would I steer you wrong?

    Sybil, fine, go recover from your drunken debauchery.

    Dave2, I agree – it will probably be more powerful than the tens of hundreds of teabaggers!

    Maria, nobody controversial has come here – help me stir up trouble. Go get some angry extremists!

    Bossy, did I teach you something new today?

    Kevin, that and Cum Dumpster were my favorites.

    Lexi, yeah, the commentary was hilarious!

  14. Sheila (Charm School Reject)

    If I hadn’t been in Tennessee, I would have been at the Chicago event.

    Instead, I am in Tennessee. I had my husband scam sprint so that we could use his phone as a modem and am now, in essence, stealing internet from myself.

    But I must not waste precious minutes trying to explain anything – I got a headache from reading all of the comments with those big ol’ words that people like to use.

    I’ll just go with “What Whall Said”.

    And NYCWD – cuz he’s a gamin’ badass.

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